Welcome!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

SignUp Now!

Pain meds and post-op depression

Maddie

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
697
Is there any connection between the type of pain meds administered post-op to the severity of possible post-op depression?
I have some choice in the type I will be getting. Wondering if narco vs non-narco is known to make a difference with this potential side effect.
 

Katie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 10, 2019
Messages
2,837
Gender Pronouns
She, Her, Hers, Herself
Gender Identity
Female
That's an interesting question, to which I have no answer. But it makes me curious. I know that post op depression is kind of common, but I have never seen anyone post about there being a connection to pain killers.
 

Donica

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Messages
1,990
Gender Pronouns
She, Her, Hers, Herself
Gender Identity
Female
I would think post-op depression is more likely caused by the reduction or lack of E just before and after surgery, or from the anesthetics?
 
Last edited:

Monica

Fight for self love!
Joined
Feb 1, 2020
Messages
2,693
Gender Pronouns
She, Her, Hers, Herself
Gender Identity
Female
My problem with the narcotics was nausea. The sooner I got away from that the better I felt physically, even with some pain and discomfort. I don't know about your question, Maddie, but I do think that managing your emotions is important. Realistic expectations are important as is recognizing that post op depression, if it happens, is temporary and manageable. Crap, for an extended period of time, you don't feel well, you are uncomfortable and you can't physically do the normal things you want to do! Of course that can get you down! The initial euphoria of getting it done was great. Humans cannot sustain that feeling forever though. When that drops off and you feel poorly physically, your mood can take a tumble. Different folks have different abilities to have discipline with their emotions, I get that, but trying to recognize what is going on can help manage it. Be patient with things! Shoot, if one is trans, one must be intimately familiar with waiting, right?
 

KathyLauren

Casting off dull certainty
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Messages
373
Gender Pronouns
She, Her, Hers, Herself
Gender Identity
Female
I was given some narcotic pain relievers when they sent me home. I only took one dose. It made me nauseous and put me to sleep. I felt sufficiently not myself that I didn't take any more. For the most part, Tylenol did the job for me.
 

Confused

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2020
Messages
764
Gender Pronouns
He, Him, His, Himself
Gender Identity
Genderfluid
After I had my prostate surgery I could no longer sleep on my back and would wake up in a panic attack if I rolled over on my back in my sleep.

Prior to GCS, I asked the anesthesiologist to give me an anti anxiety medication and have me siting upright as much as possible when I woke up. I have no idea if they gave me something, but I had no feeling of loss, post op depression, or nausea. Since waking up from GCS, I am comfortable sleeping on my back and have had no more panic attacks. I had about two days of pure hell from the catheter and ate oxycodone like candy, but once the catheter was removed I needed only occasional Tylenol for pain. Moni is correct about being uncomfortable and not feeling like you can do the normal things or awhile.

Hugs,
Mike
 
En Femme 728 x 90
Top Bottom