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Linde

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Hello all, I have some plans for the forum, and need some help with these. I bet there are some among you, our members who can and will help me with my plans.
I am looking for members who have some experience in marketing, market research, market communications, and public relations.
Please send me a PM if you are willing to help me with getting my idea of the ground.

Thanks a million!

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Linde
 

Monica

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Don't even know what these things are Linde, sorry! Might be able to fix Vangina though.
 

Linde

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Don't even know what these things are Linde, sorry! Might be able to fix Vangina though.
I have a check engine light on. Had it scanned today, and it says lean fuel mixture. What can this be, Moniiiiii?

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Linde
 

Monica

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I have a check engine light on. Had it scanned today, and it says lean fuel mixture. What can this be, Moniiiiii?

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Linde
I am actually pretty far away from this now, but I would want to see if the O2 sensor was driving it to go lean. A bad O2 could cause the computer to drive the system lean because it's falsely saying the system is too rich.
 

Donica

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Cost estimation yes, but no marketing skills Linde. Sorry.
 

KimOct

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I am actually pretty far away from this now, but I would want to see if the O2 sensor was driving it to go lean. A bad O2 could cause the computer to drive the system lean because it's falsely saying the system is too rich.

huh? :LOL:
 

Confused

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Moni, I'm like you. I can spell market research, but I'm much better at working on cars:)
 

Linde

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Moni, I'm like you. I can spell market research, but I'm much better at working on cars:)
OK, the two of you outed yourself as car workers. I can only work on old timers (like my Triumph), and have no real idea about that modern electronic stuff!
The Van-Gina throws a lean fuel code. I don't feel any difference in engine idling or running, it does not get hot(those old Triumph engines got really hot when the mixture was to lean), with other words, nothing indicates that something is wrong. Can I disregard this code, and just keep on trucking, or am I heading for a disaster when I do not fix this lean fuel code problem?
Moni thought it could be the O2 sensor? Is it hard to replace it at home, or do I have to bring it in and face a big bill to get it fixed? The Autozone guy, who read the code for me thought it could be vacuum hose? Is it easy to find such a defective hose and exchange it?
I want the Van-Gina to be ready to make the trip to Minnesota and back, and try to fix all this. It has noisy front wheel bearings, I will replace those, to make sure all that will be OK. That is a kind of work I can do, but those stupid electronic codes are a book with 7 seals for me.

Please help an old woman!


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LInde
 

Confused

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OK, the two of you outed yourself as car workers. I can only work on old timers (like my Triumph), and have no real idea about that modern electronic stuff!
The Van-Gina throws a lean fuel code. I don't feel any difference in engine idling or running, it does not get hot(those old Triumph engines got really hot when the mixture was to lean), with other words, nothing indicates that something is wrong. Can I disregard this code, and just keep on trucking, or am I heading for a disaster when I do not fix this lean fuel code problem?
Moni thought it could be the O2 sensor? Is it hard to replace it at home, or do I have to bring it in and face a big bill to get it fixed? The Autozone guy, who read the code for me thought it could be vacuum hose? Is it easy to find such a defective hose and exchange it?
I want the Van-Gina to be ready to make the trip to Minnesota and back, and try to fix all this. It has noisy front wheel bearings, I will replace those, to make sure all that will be OK. That is a kind of work I can do, but those stupid electronic codes are a book with 7 seals for me.

Please help an old woman!


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LInde

Hi Linde,

Computers moniter several engine conditions and adjusts things such as fuel injection, timing, etc to make the engine run as well as possible. When a condition gets outside of it's ability to adjust, it gives you the check engine light.

My first reaction was a vacuum leak such as a hose. However, Moni could be right as well, so I didn't comment. The computer is telling you it senses a problem. I've never been a mechanic by trade, but do almost all of my own car repairs. The newer engines with computers still have most of the same basic components of the older ones you and I grew up with. It just seems a lot more complicated.

You could look at all of the vacuum lines to make sure one isn't loose or doesn't have a crack or worn spot. Usually it happens close to a connection, but not always. It can be a leak anywhere from the big hose coming from the mass airflow sensor at the air cleaner to a little vacuum hose anywhere in the system. It doesn't have to be a big leak.

Being a van can make it harder to get into some areas to check. If it is a hose, you can fix it yourself. A hose can be a DIY and would definitely be cheaper. If it isn't a vacuum leak and you don't know much about engines, you may have to get a mechanic on it.

By the way what engine do you have and what is the code number? Google can also help.

Hugs,
Mike
 

Linde

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Hi Linde,

Computers moniter several engine conditions and adjusts things such as fuel injection, timing, etc to make the engine run as well as possible. When a condition gets outside of it's ability to adjust, it gives you the check engine light.

My first reaction was a vacuum leak such as a hose. However, Moni could be right as well, so I didn't comment. The computer is telling you it senses a problem. I've never been a mechanic by trade, but do almost all of my own car repairs. The newer engines with computers still have most of the same basic components of the older ones you and I grew up with. It just seems a lot more complicated.

You could look at all of the vacuum lines to make sure one isn't loose or doesn't have a crack or worn spot. Usually it happens close to a connection, but not always. It can be a leak anywhere from the big hose coming from the mass airflow sensor at the air cleaner to a little vacuum hose anywhere in the system. It doesn't have to be a big leak.

Being a van can make it harder to get into some areas to check. If it is a hose, you can fix it yourself. A hose can be a DIY and would definitely be cheaper. If it isn't a vacuum leak and you don't know much about engines, you may have to get a mechanic on it.

By the way what engine do you have and what is the code number? Google can also help.

Hugs,
Mike
Thank you Mike, the engine is the 4.2 liter V6. The van is supposedly from 2001, but some of the build in components say 2003. it could be that the chassis was sitting on the lot of the converter, for that long until they converted it (this seems to be pretty common with motorhomes). I don't know the code number, the guy just told me what it said on his reader.

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Linde
 

Katie

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@Linde it could be a few different things. Ultimately, a lean condition means that the fuel delivery system is not delivering enough fuel for the amount of air entering the engine. It could be the fuel filter, fuel pump, a fuel injector, a faulty mass air sensor, a faulty manifold pressure sensor, a faulty throttle position sensor, a vacuum leak, or a faulty O2 sensor.
 

Linde

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@Linde it could be a few different things. Ultimately, a lean condition means that the fuel delivery system is not delivering enough fuel for the amount of air entering the engine. It could be the fuel filter, fuel pump, a fuel injector, a faulty mass air sensor, a faulty manifold pressure sensor, a faulty throttle position sensor, a vacuum leak, or a faulty O2 sensor.
Katie, most of the other parts would impair the smooth running of the engine in/or/and idling and under load. I have not experienced any negative engine operation since the darn light came on. It cannot be anything really in fuel delivery, because the van exhilarates just fine and without hesitation. A faulty fuel injector would cause a rough engine operation.
I think it is something minor that causes the problem, but what? Rational thinking points to a sensor or a leak.

My question is if it is easy and low cot to replace the O2 sensor, and/or find a vacuum leak. If I go to a shop they charge more than $100 to hang the thing to a computer, to find out (sometimes) what is wrong. It might be cheaper for me just to throw out low cst components one after the other until I eliminated the problem.

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Linde
 

Donica

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So Linde, it's looking like everyone is saying, unless you have all the necessary equipment and/or skills to diagnose the problem, you will need to take it to someone who does. Maybe some Google research to find out if anyone else with the same Vangina type and year is having the same problem, and what did they, if anything, have to do about it. Self auto repair sucks. I can't do it myself anymore without losing blood.
 

Linde

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So Linde, it's looking like everyone is saying, unless you have all the necessary equipment and/or skills to diagnose the problem, you will need to take it to someone who does. Maybe some Google research to find out if anyone else with the same Vangina type and year is having the same problem, and what did they, if anything, have to do about it. Self auto repair sucks. I can't do it myself anymore without losing blood.
I can do almost any repair, I have most tools needed, and, unlike you, I have a young strong male living with me, who can swing the wrenches in locations I can't get to anymore. I just have to tell him what to do. And that is what I am trying to figure out now.

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Linde
 

Confused

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Linde,

I don't disagree with anything that has been said, but you should be able to find a bad vacuum hose, if there is one. It is something you can eliminate without paying someone else to diagnose it.

One thing I was thinking, but didn't say, was something Katie said. The mass airflow sensor could be dirty. My experiences with the MAF though, is that it usually makes the car lose power, or affect performnce somehow, as would most things related to fuel. A bad or dirty injector should normally make it idle or run rough.

I didn't think about the manifold pressure sensor. That is a possibility. A leaky EGR can also cause it, but is hard to check. Either way, just replacing parts can also get expensive.



Obviously your go to repair group has expanded :)

Hugs,
Mike
 
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Linde

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Thanks Mike, I will try to identify a possible vacuum hose, maybe that I even can hear some hissing sound (with some luck).
Reading around, everything else would make the engine to run rough, or different. Nothing of this has come up. The only indicator is this stupid "service engine soon" light.
I just remember that the PCV vale did throw the light, but I don't remember if it influenced the engine operation. How about a poorly sealing or loose gas tank lid?
Sorry that I use you guys for brainstorming, but I have nobody around who I can bounce ideas off on. I have sets of willing hands here, but with little knowledge of automotive technique. I also have to admit that they did not teach us much about it in med school!


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Linde
 

Confused

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Thanks Mike, I will try to identify a possible vacuum hose, maybe that I even can hear some hissing sound (with some luck).
Reading around, everything else would make the engine to run rough, or different. Nothing of this has come up. The only indicator is this stupid "service engine soon" light.
I just remember that the PCV vale did throw the light, but I don't remember if it influenced the engine operation. How about a poorly sealing or loose gas tank lid?
Sorry that I use you guys for brainstorming, but I have nobody around who I can bounce ideas off on. I have sets of willing hands here, but with little knowledge of automotive technique. I also have to admit that they did not teach us much about it in med school!


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Linde

Linde,

If you had a leak loud enough to hear it hissing, you would probably not be telling me it runs normal. It might be easier to find if you have a small mirror you can look at the bottom side of the hoses. It is usually my luck that they are underneath and out of sight:) The PCV could cause a lean code, but I don't believe a loose gas cap would. If memory serves me right, you would get a different code for the cap. A PCV is cheap.

If you do find a leak and fix it, take a battery cable off and wait a minute or two to put it back on. That doesn't necessarily remove the code, but resets the warning light. If the light doesn't come back on after you start the van back up or drive a few minutes, you likely fixed it.

Hugs,
Mike
 
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